Exposing the Scammers

So How do I protect myself from these scammers?

Hopefully you have read through all of the information on this website and understand the difference between reputable breeders and those who are breeding solely for profit. When searching for your next pet please review this checklist and ensure you reduce your chances of purchasing from a scam breeder

1. Read the Standard for the Breed you are interested in

Links on this website will take you to the Breed Standards for both Pembroke and Cardigan Welsh Corgis. The Standard describes the ideal breed specimen – size, coat, colour, etc. Armed with this information you have most of the information you need.

2. Avoid Breeders offering “Rare” or “Special Colours”

Any breeder who is selling colours that are not included in the standard for the breed is automatically not breeding for the betterment of the breed. They are breeding solely to produce puppies for profit. In order to generate profit, costs such as health testing are eliminated.

3. Ask what registry puppies are registered with.

In North America there are only two true registries – the Canadian Kennel Club, and the American Kennel Club. These are the only two registries that you should accept puppies from. The breeders who are unable to register puppies with one of these two registries are unable to for one of two reasons. First, either the puppies ARE NOT PUREBRED, or secondly THEY HAVE BEEN SUBJECT TO DISCIPLINE AND BARRED FROM REGISTRATION PRIVILEGES.

Because they can’t use the legitimate registries, most of the blue Pembroke breeders are using the Continental Kennel Club which is nothing more than a scam registry. As long as you send in money you can register almost anything with the Continental Kennel Club (many years ago someone registered their pet turtle). The worst part is that the scam breeders use the acronym CKC leading purchasers to believe their dogs are Canadian Kennel Club registered, when in actuality they are only registered with the Continental Kennel Club.

4. Ask for proof of Breed Club Membership

Any breeder who is truly interested in the betterment of the breed will be a member of at least one National or Regional breed Club. In Canada these would include the Canadian Kennel Club, the Canadian Cardigan Corgi Club and the Pembroke Welsh Corgi Club of Canada. In the United States these would be the Cardigan Welsh Corgi Club of America or the Pembroke Welsh Corgi Club of America.

5. Ask to see the paperwork of the parents.

Sample CKC registration 2 Sample CKC Limited registration 2

These are samples of Canadian Kennel Club registration papers. The border should be BLUE. If it is green, the registration is a NON-BREEDING meaning the dog is not to be bred and its progeny will not be registerable The papers should have a CKC watermark. If there is any doubt as to their authenticity take down the numbers and contact the Canadian Kennel Club for verification (416-675-5511)

Sample AKC registration 2

AKC Limited Registration 2

These are samples of American Kennel Club registration papers. If the border is orange and it says Limited Registration Certificate at the bottom, the registration is a NON-BREEDING meaning the dog is not to be bred and its progeny will not be registerable The papers should have an AKC logo. If there is any doubt as to their authenticity take down the numbers and you can verify them on the AKC website (www.akc.org) or contact the American Kennel Club for verification (919-233-9767)

health-tests - marked up
Please note that, sadly, some of the scammers are using this page for their own benefit – including downloading the previous copy of this image which was not marked up. If anyone provides you with a photo of papers for “Yasashiikuma Smoky Mountn Maid” they are false! She was born, lived, and died in Melancthon, Ontario and never lived elsewhere.

Titles earned by the parents should be verified with certificates from the Canadian or American Kennel Clubs

Any breeder who is truly interested in the betterment of the breed will be do the health tests required by the parent club for the breed. If the tests have been done then there will be paperwork. Any tests from the Orthopaedic Foundation for Animals can be verified on their website (www.offa.org). Other tests should come from reputable labs such as DDC (www.vetdnacenter.com) or Vetnostics (www.vetnostic.com)

Testing that can be done include:

Hips (required by PWCCA Code of Ethics) – these will be done by either OFA or Pennhip. Older dogs may have OVC (Ontario Veterinary College) certification but this facility no longer certifies hips.

Eyes – (required by PWCCA Code of Ethics) – these are now certified by AVCO (previously by CERF) and may be available on the OFA website if the owner has submitted them.

DM – (Degenerative Myelopathy) – this is a disease similar to ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) in humans. The spinal cord gradually ceases to have the ability to transmit messages to the end and the dog loses control of functions from the rear end forward.

In Cardigans all of these tests are also available, however not mandated as required by the parent clubs.

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